Ask a Lawyer – Main

Get personalized legal advice from experienced attorneys

Ask your question - be specific, but leave out any personally identifiable information

Get answers - from lawyers who are notified as soon as you post

Rest assured - your privacy is important to us, all questions are posted anonymously

*ALL FIELDS REQUIRED

  • Tips for asking good questions

    Be brief and to the point
    Lawyers are more likely to look at and answer concise questions that clearly pertain to their practice areas. Save the details for the next section

    Stay focused

    Limit your question to single legal issue. If you have additional legal concerns, you can post additional questions


  • Proper format "Your details...."

  • Proper format "Phoneix/Arizona"

By clicking the "Submit" button, you understand that the question you are asking may become public, therefore, do not include any personally identifiable information in your question. This question does not create an attorney-client privilege. The email address is not posted publicly and is only used to respond to the question you ask. To contact us directly in a private setting use our contact us form.

Recently answered questions


One of the most pressing concerns for any parent going through a divorce, legal separation, or break up is what will happen with the children.  Even in the most amicable of breakups numerous new challenges arise, including changes in housing, finances, scheduling, work, and many other areas of life, all of which must be considered and addressed to create a parenting plan in the children’s best interest.  In more contentious breakups there may be additional serious issues present such as neglect, abuse, addiction, as well as other serious concerns.

California Family Code §3170 requires that in any contested custody case that the parties first participate in mediation to attempt to resolve custody disputes with an agreement before the issues are tried in front of a judge.   This requirement is imposed under the belief that an agreement which the parties come up with themselves for their children is usually better and will be more successful in the long term than one imposed by the courts.  To assist the parties in working through these various difficult issues the mediation is conducted with the assistance of highly trained therapists who are familiar with the common issues that need to be addressed in custody disputes.

In some counties, commonly referred to as “recommending” counties the mediator has an additional role when the parties are unable to reach an agreement.  In these counties the mediator will present a written recommendation to the court regarding a parenting plan for the minor children.  In these counties the mediation process has increased significance as the mediator’s recommendations are often adopted in whole or in large part by the court.  Many local counties, including Sacramento, Placer, Yolo, San Joaquin, and Stanislaus counties are recommending counties.  In other counties, the mediation process is entirely confidential and the mediator does not make recommendations to the judge if the parties are unable to reach an agreement.

All courts in California have an office called Family Court Services to provide mediation services to the parties in contested custody cases.  Most custody mediation is handled through these court offices that provide their mediation services at no cost to the parties.   As an alternative parties may request (either with an agreement or without) that the parties be referred to private Child Custody Recommending Counseling (CCRC) to assist parties in resolving contested custody issues and if needed, to investigate and prepare a recommendation to the court regarding custody.   This counseling is done by an experienced therapist within special training dealing with contested custody issues.  The expense of the private CCRC is paid by the parties, usually with the party who requested it advancing or paying 100% of the cost upfront with the court reserving the ability to divide the cost between the parties at a later date.  Due to limited resources in the office of Family Court Services, most mediation sessions last between 15 minutes to one hour, whereas when the case is set for private CCRC the parties will spend multiple hours with the counselor who will also invest time outside of these meetings investigating and preparing recommendations.  While it is not necessary or affordable for parties in all cases, private CCRC provides a valuable service to resolve difficult custody disputes.

If you are facing decisions regarding custody issues it is important that you contact an experience family law attorney who can advise you regarding your options and strategies to obtain a custody order in your children’s best interests.

The fundamental purpose of child support in California is to ensure that the needs of children are provided for.  Under California law each parent has an obligation to financially support their children (Family Code §4053(b)).  Practically, the state has adopted a uniform guideline formula to calculate the amount of support that should be paid keeping in mind each parent’s obligation to support their child.  Simply speaking, the guideline formula calculates support based upon each parent’s income and the amount of time each parent has with her child.

To ensure that a child is supported, in the appropriate case the court may count a new spouse’s income in calculating support.  However, under the law a new spouses’ income should not be considered except in an extraordinary case (Family Code §4057.5(a)(1)).  The family code lists examples of these extraordinary cases, including when a parent “voluntarily or intentionally quits work or reduces income” or when a parent “intentionally remains unemployed or underemployed and relies on a subsequent spouse’s income” (Family Code §4057.5(b)).  The law recognizes that in this case it is appropriate to use a new spouse’s income to calculate support so that the entire burden for supporting a child does not fall on the parent who is still working.  (Marriage of Paulin (1996) 46 Cal.App.4th 1378, 1384, fn. 5).

It is important that if you are facing these issues that you contact an experienced family law attorney to ensure that child support is set in an amount that is fair and proper.

On October 4, 2013 Governor Jerry Brown signed into law Senate Bill 274 which enacted new statutory amendments to clarify that a child may have more than two parents in the appropriate circumstance.  This means that in certain circumstances more than two parties can have the rights to custody and visitation of a minor child, and that more than two parents may have the obligation to support a child.

The new law provides that a child may be found to have more than two parents if it would be detrimental to the child to recognize only two parents.  To determine whether there would be detriment to a child in this circumstance the court is called to consider various factors including whether a proposed third parent has met the physical needs of that child, whether they have met the psychological needs of a child for care and affection, and how long they have assumed that role, among other factors.

In addition to showing that there would be detriment to the child if there are only two parents, one of several existing statutory grounds to establish paternity will have to be proven as to the non-biological parent.  Some examples of these methods of establishing paternity are (1) being married to the mother of the child, (2) attempting to marry the mother of the child before or after the child’s birth, (3) or receiving that child into their home and holding it out as their own.

Demonstrating to a court that these facts exist can be complicated and may require expert testimony from child psychologists or other child custody professionals and will often have to be resolved with a trial or evidentiary hearing.  It is important if you are facing these complicated issues that you consult with a family law attorney right away to assist you in navigating these very tricky claims.

A common situation that comes up during a dissolution matter is dividing the equity in a house that was owned by one spouse prior to marriage. In most cases the non-owning spouse is entitled to receive a portion of the equity in the house. The general rule in California dissolutions is that all community property (property from the marriage) is to be divided equally. The complication in this situation is that at part of the loan was paid outside of the marriage and part was paid during the marriage. To make matters even more complicated, the value of homes generally fluctuate constantly throughout the parties marriage and the divorce process.

 

Two California cases (In Re Marriage of Moore and In Re Marriage of Marsden) have established a method for dealing with these issues. Simply put, the portion of the equity of the house which came from the marriage will be split equally and the portion of equity from before or after marriage belongs to the spouse who owns the property. To determine the correct apportionment of these two, the courts look to the value and loan balance at four different dates: (1) Date of Purchase, (2) Date of Marriage, (3) Date of Separation, and (4) Date of Trial. With this information correct percentage and values owed to each spouse can be determined.

 

Generally, the assistance of a real estate appraiser is required to determine these values. Further, close examination of the loan documentation is also required. If the house has been re-financed at any point in time, additional information and documentation has to be reviewed. In many cases, the parties can hire an agreed appraiser to determine these values and can agree to a fair buyout amount. In other cases the value may be contested and it may be necessary to have the court decide this value. Either way, it is important when dealing with this issue to contact a skilled attorney to assist you in navigating this complicated claim. You may contact our office to discuss this issue further with one of our attorneys.

In the State of California, the courts may be able to impute minimum wage earning capacity to a parent, and it is up to that parent to prove why he/she may not be able to earn or get a minimum wage job. For example, if he/she has a disability, or lacks in education or skills, medical condition, etc. The reason for this is that both parents are required to give support to their children, regardless of whether one is acting as the primary caregiver or not. Read the full answer…

In cases involving judgment on the division of property in a marital dissolution proceeding where one party wishes to have any modification made, their remedy is a timely set-aside motion within 6 months after the judgment is made, as per CCP § 473(b). But if the 6-month time bar expires, they may find an equitable relief through Fam.C. § 2120 et seq which sets forth the strict grounds for a set aside motion, and time limits applicable (Fam. C. § 2122).

For modifications involving property division in a divorce, work with an experienced divorce lawyer for more information and proper guidance.

In furtherance of the public policy that a person is presumed not to have committed bigamy, there is a rebuttable presumption that the second of two successive marriages is valid (i.e., that former marriage was legally terminated by death or marital status judgment). However, A subsequent marriage or domestic partnership is illegal and void from the beginning if either party has a spouse or domestic partner still living unless the former  marriage/domestic partnership was dissolved or adjudged a nullity before the date of the subsequent marriage/domestic partnership [Fam.C. § 2201(a)(1)].

Even though a void marriage or domestic partnership is technically nonexistent, a judgment of nullity is still advisable. The judgment will eliminate doubt as to the parties’ marital status (making the fact of invalidity a matter of public record); and will also conclusively determine the parties’ “marital” property and support rights.

Contact a lawyer who is an expert in divorce and annulment to be better informed and guided in matters regarding status of a previous marriage and the validity of a subsequent marriage.

According to common law, you may have a chance to get reimbursement from the child’s biological father. However, you can’t use that as a leverage to get out of debt responsibilities. You should discuss this with an attorney who is an expert in family law to find out what your chances of reimbursement are and what you need to do to get it. Read the full answer…

Yes, there is either a 2-year or 4-year statute of limitations for debts in California. However, this doesn’t stop the collection agency or the creditor to file a lawsuit against a debtor. Read the full answer…

Yes, you need to be present at the hearing, even if you didn’t request for it, to make sure that you can defend your side on why there should be no modification on the support. Although it is not mandatory to be represented by an attorney, it is often a good idea to have an expert in family law on your side to make sure that your argument will be presented well, in a way that could best convince the court. Read the full answer…

Provided that your mother never moved, or that her address at the time the divorce was filed has been known to your father, then clearly there is a breach in the process of properly serving her the summons. Your father and his attorney could face sanctions as a result of this. Your mother may also has the right to an independent action in equity to set aside a default judgment as void for defective service of process. Read the full answer…

Our loan of $750,000 was given to me without even making more than $350 a week! They even suggested my husband’s name be taken off so he would not have to deal with it. I am not very wise when it comes to left-brain things and basically signed on the lines they told me to. We now have a horrible loan, we had to live off credit cards for 3 years because we needed all our money to keep our home and we are paying $5500 a month and we still owe $720,000! The loan was sold so many times that I lost track. Chase owns it now and won’t modify. We are in large industry construction and when the recession hit we almost lost everything. We can’t even afford health insurance and are now strapped with paying emergency room bills because of heath issues. We make too much to qualify for assistance even though all our money is spent paying bills. Our business has picked up a bit and we’ve done everything to pay all our bills on time but we need help. So many companies are calling! to get my credit cards cut in half and promising to hook me up with their lawyers for $5000 and $29.95 per month for years. I don’t know who to turn to but do know that everyone has told me my case is the best they’ve ever seen for loan fraud! They promise to get all our money back and a really great loan but why do I have to go through a middleman? Is there a good faith lawyer out there who handles this sort of fraud? We don’t qualify for the Obama loan modification by $60,000, I believe, and we make too much for medical help. Can you assist me in not making anymore mistakes with our home loan?

Question Asked on: August 5th, 2013

For such a complex case, you do need to immediately consult with an attorney who is an expert in debt management, and at the same time an expert negotiator who could deal with your creditors and possibly convince them to agree on a different terms or modes of payment. Read the full answer…

Winning a battle for custody is generally about taking the children’s welfare into utmost consideration. The court will consider what is the best for the children, regardless of their age. If the court sees that the children will be better off if they are with the father, then it will be granted to you. The key is to make your argument persuasive and factual that your children will have better lives with you than with the mother. Read the full answer…

Child custody order is always for the best interest of the child. If you and your wife both have legal rights to the child as the child’s legal parents, then the factors surrounding the conception (infidelity) doesn’t play a major role in the outcome of the custody order. What the court would consider is what is best for the child in this matter. Read the full answer…

It is a difficult situation where you want something achieved but you seem to be not getting it. First, speak with your lawyer and ask him exactly why he would refuse to do it the way you told him. He might have a valid response, and since he knows your case more than anybody does, he is in the position to give you the necessary advice. Read the full answer…

Your entitlement to the properties will depend on their nature, whether they are community, quasi-community or separate property. If it’s community or quasi-community property, then you and your husband may have a 50-50 interest in it, and you have no interest in your spouse’s separate property. Read the full answer…

Even if a parent has the right to spend time with their children, no parent is allowed to deprive the other of their chance to be with their children if either of them are entitled to custody.

In custody issues, the courts always put the child’s best interest before anything else. If your ex has been proven to have a history of domestic violence, it may work against him in a custody battle, especially if it has been proven that the violence has negatively affected the children. Read the full answer…

It may be a good thing that you did not go through the IRS hotline before you have consulted with a lawyer who could study your case and suggest options that are better for you. You can request the IRS to reinstate your agreement, or file an appeal if you think that there is an error in the computation of your taxes. Tax laws could be complex and it may be quite difficult at times to deal with the IRS yourself. Read the full answer…

You can make an estimate of what is a fair amount of alimony and child support depending on you and your children’s needs. Whatever you and your soon-to-be-ex-husband may agree on will be part of the final judgment. Whether it is fair or not will depend on your needs and expectations. But you really have to be careful and consult with a divorce lawyer before agreeing to any amount of support. Read the full answer…

You did not mention how many you are in your household, which has a bearing on which median income to apply for your particular case. In California, for example, the median income for a 2-person household is $63,030, for 3-person is $67,401, for 4-person is $75,656 and an additional $8,100 for any additional member in excess of 4. Read the full answer…

Since you know of your husband’s plan to file for divorce, then it is for your best interest to get an expert divorce attorney as soon as possible. Since your current residence is your marital home, he can only legally kick you out through a court order, regardless if it is his separate property. Read the full answer…

You can amend your petition from divorce to annulment by withdrawing your first petition and filling out a new form, the same form as you used to file the divorce. But instead of dissolution, and check the box for annulment AND amended. There are also rules to follow after the amendment is made, such as serving the amended petition to your soon-to-be ex-wife. Read the full answer…

The issue of jurisdiction and applicable laws on the statute of limitations for debt has always been a tricky subject if it considers more than one state, such as in your case. First, if the creditor has not yet filed any case against you for your debt, the applicable SOL will depend on what is stated in your contract, if there is any clause involving choice of applicable laws. Read the full answer…

Assuming that your case was “dismissed without prejudice,” then you may refile for divorce. You and your ex may use services of the same attorney since there is no dispute on property, support, etc. The attorney’s fees vary, so it is best to speak with one personally and discuss your case. Read the full answer…

If your mother did not execute a power of attorney or any document for that matter prior to the onset of her dementia, then one possible way for you to rent out, or maybe even sell the house, is by applying for conservatorship of her estate. Read the full answer…

First, do not speak to the Coast Guard or arresting officer or anyone else regarding this matter until you have spoken to a BUI/DUI lawyer. Consequences for BUI are generally much tougher than DUI because driving on water is deemed more unsafe than on land. Read the full answer…

You can transfer your property directly to your parents’ living trust through a grant deed by putting your parents’ trust as the grantee in the deed. But it is advisable to consult with a lawyer first before proceeding with the transfer to make sure that the transfer happens without problems. Read the full answer…

Usually, establishing paternity would require the signature of both parents. However, since the father is deceased, then you need to go to court and then the court will decide whether or not there is the existence of relationship between the child and your daughter’s fiance. Read the full answer…

California tax laws have a lot of differences with federal tax laws. However, there is an exclusion for gains for a sale of a home in California not exceeding $250,000. There is also an exception from withholding tax under Section 121 of the Tax Code. Read the full answer…

Where you file for modification depends on where the judgment was made. But California may have jurisdiction especially if your daughter has lived in this state and goes to school, essentially making California her home state. You may fill out the Request for Order Form (FL-300), Read the full answer…

You can file for divorce in the same manner as if your spouse is not in prison, as long as you can make sure that the summons is served to him personally through the prison authorities and you have a valid proof of that. Getting full custody of your children will be up to the court to decide, taking into consideration the children’s best interest. Read the full answer…

Payroll taxes cannot be eliminated in bankruptcy. Qualifying for bankruptcy is usually a case-to-case basis. Whether you’re filing as an individual or business, it depends on the income, assets and liabilities and other factors. If you are struggling to pay off your debt, then it is best to consult a bankruptcy lawyer first before filing for bankruptcy to ensure that you qualify, or if you may still be able to negotiate with debtors regarding payment and schedules. Read the full answer…

Social security wages cannot be garnished. However, if one opened a bank account and deposits the SS earnings there, they should notify the FTB. Otherwise the bank account will be used as part of their collections activities. There must be proof that ALL the money in the bank account came from social security alone, and that no other amount has been deposited from other sources. Read the full answer…

If your are filing for legal separation, you may ask for spousal support as part of your settlement. Your husband will also be required to pay for child support. Provided that custody will be granted to you, he is obliged to pay for his share of the expenses for your child’s needs. And if you want to go back to Germany with your son, you may need to file for an international move-away permission from the court. Read the full answer…

Concealment of a DUI is not grounds for annulment. Fraud as a ground for the annulment of marriage must constitute concealment of something that is vital to the relationship and the essence of marriage. Neither are drinking problems nor change in character grounds for annulment. Read the full answer…

Yes you can. Just like in divorce or annulment cases, a spouse may petition for support in a legal separation. The court will grant the amount of support upon their discretion, based on the standard of living during marriage, the length of marriage, the capacity of either spouse to provide or find a source of income, etc. Read the full answer…

One option is to contact your creditor to clarify the details of your debt, and if possible, so that you can come to an agreement regarding other ways for you to pay the debt. And also, depending on the debt, generally there is a 2-year or 4-year statute of limitations for the collection of debt, but this doesn’t stop the creditor from pursuing the case and demand payment. Read the full answer…

You may contact the insurance company and ask them if there is an option for you to pay directly to them. They may be able to receive your payment and certify that you have indeed paid for your share according to the court order. If you have an attorney, consult with them regarding the details of the order to make sure that you are complying with what has been stipulated. Read the full answer…

The court may appoint counsel to represent the best interest of a child on the court’s own motion or if requested to do so by a party, the attorney for a party, the child or any relative of the child, a mediator, a custody evaluator, a court-appointed guardian ad litem or special advocate or any other person who the court deems appropriate. The court will appoint a counsel for the child if it finds that it is for his best interest, and one of those factors include whether the dispute involves allegations of physical, emotional, or sexual abuse of the child. Read the full answer…

Since the custody was determined in AZ, that court has original jurisdiction and California courts cannot modify the custody order except in certain cases. However, there are exceptions wherein you may be able to file for a custody modification in California should you meet certain conditions. For example, if AZ court determines it no longer has exclusive and continuing jurisdiction, or if a California court would be a more convenient forum. Read the full answer…

Your parents could legally hold the money depending on the stipulation on your grandmother’s will, especially if your parents (or at least one of them) were assigned as the executor or trustee. One of your options is to study the will and what is written on it regarding the conditions set as to when and how you could get your inheritance. Read the full answer…

Unfortunately for you, the non-custodial parent cannot be forced to see his/her children if they don’t want to. But try to go back to mediation and come up with a set-up that would work for both parents, but most especially for the children. You may want to consult and work with a family law attorney who could guide you through the process, from mediation up to the court. Read the full answer…

Since he is the father of the child, he could get visitation rights if he brings the action to court. But there is a great chance that you will be granted full custody if the court finds that it is for the child’s best interest to stay with his mother. Just to make it clear, even if you have full custody, he may still get visitation rights if the court grants it. Read the full answer…

For Chapter 7 bankruptcy, a fee of $306 is collected upon filing (http://www.uscourts.gov/FederalCourts/Bankruptcy/BankruptcyResources/BankruptcyFilingFees.aspx). However, knowing whether filing for Chapter 7 is a good choice or not depends on different factors such as the amount of debt versus the income received, among others that may be considered. Based on the information you have given, your mother probably will benefit from filing for bankruptcy, Read the full answer…

Yes, you can. For legal separation, like in dissolution, judgment could include support. Spousal support may be awarded in a final judgment upon the discretion of the court, taking into consideration certain things like the lifestyle during marriage, the capacity of the obligor to provide, the capacity of the supported spouse to earn a living, etc. While courts have a broad discretion when awarding spousal support, Read the full answer…

The answer to your question depends on the situation, such as for what reason was your license suspended, or if there were other stipulations related to the suspension of your license, or how many times has your license been suspended before, etc. Contact a lawyer as soon as possible first, to seek advice regarding your license situation, and to deal with the accident and possible issues with the insurance companies of the parties involved. Read the full answer…

Yes. Non-payment of child support by an obligor, who is otherwise capable of paying but chooses not to, has serious consequences. If he still doesn’t pay the support after the involvement of the local child support agency, the court could hold him in contempt and he could face jail time if proven guilty of evading child support payment. Read the full answer…

Common law marriage has long been abolished in California. So generally, unless an unmarried couple who lived together register as domestic partners, they acquire no rights that are granted to married couples or registered domestic partners. However, the partner may have remedy in an ordinary civil action, instead of the family court, if they would want to stake claim at properties owned by the deceased. Read the full answer…

Renouncing US citizenship may not have an effect on tax obligations. The US government still imposes taxes on US income for nonresidents. If you are renouncing your U.S. citizenship and are no longer planning to receive US income, you may be required to file taxes only for the portion of the year that you were still a US citizen.

Read the full answer…

They won’t grant emancipation simply because you want to see your boyfriend. To be granted emancipation, you must meet ALL of the requirements: you must be 14 years or older, you don’t want to live with your parents and your parents don’t mind if you move out, you have your own way to legally make money, Read the full answer…

That depends on which loan you applied for. Since you were able to receive the loan, then it means you were qualified for it, provided that you gave them truthful information about yourself at the time of the application. You cannot escape student loans, so try to negotiate with the creditor for a payment system that would work best for you to pay it off. Read the full answer…

You are right to be looking for a property tax attorney. However, be warned that you should not delay any further since the deadline for redemption or initiation of payment plan for a property that tax-defaulted in 2008 is on July 1, 2013. It would be best to find a lawyer who is not only knowledgeable on tax issues, Read the full answer…

It depends on whether you actually did beat up your girlfriend, and if so, the circumstances surrounding that incident. Pursuant to California Penal Code section 12022.9(a), a 5-year sentencing enhancement is imposed on a defendant who knows or reasonably should know that a woman is pregnant, and yet commits a felony during which he or she personally inflicts injury upon that pregnant woman that results in the termination of her pregnancy. Read the full answer…

Getting non-parent custody would require proving that it is in the child’s best interest to be under the care of a person other than his/her parent. It is already complex as it is with the help of an experienced lawyer, and it would be at least doubly challenging without one. Read the full answer…

It is the statutory duty of the parents, to the extent of the parent’s ability, to support an adult child who is lacks the capacity to support themselves. If you are able to pay for the support for your child, then you are obligated to do so. The SSI benefits are for those who have no other financial source, or whose income is not enough to meet their basic needs. Read the full answer…

You are not liable for your deceased husband’s credit card debts especially because, as you mentioned, he did not leave any property that could pay for the debt. In addition to that, if he acquired the debt during the separation while the dissolution was in progress, you are not liable for that even if he were still alive; Read the full answer…

If you are registered domestic partners, then there is no going around declaring your income as would other married couples because that would be tax evasion or fraud. However, if you are not registered as domestic partners, then you need not factor in your partner’s income in filing your tax return because you are still single and unmarried under the law. Read the full answer…

Based on what you have stated, you may be qualified to apply for spousal support modification. There are several factors that the court would consider in awarding spousal support such as the length of marriage, the capacity of the spouses to earn, etc. It was unwise to have gone through divorce without consulting a legal expert, so don’t make that same mistake and personally work with one this time. Read the full answer…

No. Your husband was ordered to pay support probably because he was the “default” father of the child. Even a DNA test proving that he is actually not the biological father would not reverse the court’s decision ordering him to pay, and he may not get reimbursement for the child support. Read the full answer…

Generally, property acquired during marriage is considered as community property. But if it is a separate property of the wife, then you do not have any right to it. There are not a lot of details here to give more opinion on the actual nature of the home and the situation surrounding your case. It would be better to personally get in touch and consult with an attorney who is an expert in Family Law for advice. Read the full answer…

If there is a risk that your ex may take the child to another state or country, you may file for a “move-away” restraining order. However, the restraining order against you may only be suspended or stopped upon the determination of the court that the child is not going to be at risk of being abused. Until then, the custody of the child will not be given to you. Read the full answer…

Under the Child Abuse and Neglect provisions of the California Penal Code, doctors have a statutory obligation to report to authorities a reasonable suspicion of child abuse or neglect that they discovered within their scope of employment or professional capacity. (Penal Code § 11165.7.) If a doctor does come across a case of reasonable suspicion of child abuse and does not report it, that doctor may liable for the resulting injuries in a negligence cause of action. Read the full answer…

It depends on what you’re seeking. If you’re seeking a criminal case against Walmart, it depends on your state’s specific gun laws. Some states have really lax gun laws, while other states have more stringent requirements that mandate certain types of background checks. As you may have heard in the news, the federal government is having trouble passing a law that would require mental health and strict background checks in order to purchase guns. Read the full answer…

It depends. Under the Fourth Amendment, the home is sacred and generally, the police cannot enter without at least a warrant, consent, or some sort of exigent circumstance. While the police can ask you for consent, they cannot threaten or coerce you to give it. The United States Supreme Court has held that any consent given to the police or other government official to search must be voluntary, that is, free of duress or coercion. Read the full answer…

Unfortunately, if you are not the owner of the bike and the bike is not under your name, then there is not much you can do. One question that remains obvious is the circumstances under which you claim ownership of the bike. How is it that you claim to own the bike when there is another owner and your name is not on the title? Read the full answer…

Unfortunately, the answer is no. The “fruit of a poisonous tree” doctrine that you reference comes from well-settled United States Supreme Court case law regarding the Fourth Amendment. The Fourth Amendment protects people from unreasonable searches and seizures of their “persons, houses, papers and effects.” Read the full answer…

A power of attorney requires the express permission of the person granting that power; and since your mother is already incapacitated to grant that, the best recourse for your father to be able to better manage the properties is to apply to the court for conservatorship. Read the full answer…

Parents are obliged to support all their minor children’s needs according to each parent’s capacity (Fam C. 3900). But when the child reaches adulthood (18 years) before he/she finishes high school, this statutory obligation continues for parents to support the child who is a full-time high school student, unmarried and not fully self-supporting until he/she graduates from high school or until the child reaches 19 years, Read the full answer…

FL-180 is the form used to finalize the judgment in a dissolution proceeding, and the contents of the stipulated judgment puts a rest on all issues covered, unless one of the parties withdraws a specific issue from the judgment. As you said, the FL-180 that he gave you “stays true” to what you have agreed upon. Read the full answer…

If you are determined to file for bankruptcy and would qualify, it is possible to do it from abroad. However, you would still need to fill up and sign the appropriate forms yourself. Forms for that are downloadable from the website of the bankruptcy court of the state. Read the full answer…

Although summary dissolutions where no children, property or support are involved is the “fastest” way of getting a divorce, there is still a mandatory 6-month waiting period from the earlier of either the date of service of copy of summons and petition, or respondent’s appearance [Fam.C. § 2339(a)]. Read the full answer…

The statute of limitations for credit card debts starts running after the last transaction was made on the card, e.g. a purchase using the credit card or a payment made on the card, and runs up to 4 years as per the California Code of Civil Procedure 337. Read the full answer…

There are no exceptions to the requirements for summary dissolution that are enumerated in Fam.C. § 2400, where it specifically states on (a) that a summary dissolution will be allowed “if all of the…conditions exist at the time the proceeding is commenced.” Read the full answer…

The best and the only way of legally changing or stopping the payment of court-ordered spousal support is through the court. The court may modify or terminate support orders anytime, as it deems necessary [Fam. C. 3651(a)]. Sometimes the court may consider the supported spouse’s cohabitation with a person of the opposite sex as a considerable change in circumstances that Read the full answer…

When faced with serious financial difficulties due to debts, there are times when the best recourse would be to file for voluntary bankruptcy to get a fresh start in life. Filing for bankruptcy may help eliminate most, or maybe even all of one’s credit card debts. Read the full answer…

The duration for the payment of spousal support is stipulated on the final judgment in a dissolution case. When the court decides to award alimony upon dissolution, it is upon the court’s discretion as to the amount and the duration of the support. This decision is based on the facts at the time of the support hearing and the spousal support factors stipulated in Fam.C. § 4320. Read the full answer…

Payment of spousal support after the dissolution of marriage is upon the court’s discretion, taking into strict consideration the mandatory provisions set by Fam. C. 4320 such as, but not limited to, the earning capacity of each party and “the ability of the supported party to engage in gainful employment.” Read the full answer…

Whether an organization falls under IRS Code Section 501(c)7 or IRS Code Section 501(c)3 depends on the nature and objectives of the group. A social club that is organized for pleasure, recreation, and other similar purposes, and supported by membership dues, fees and assessments would usually fall under IRS Code Section 501(c)7 for non-profit organizations. Read the full answer…

A grant deed basically “transfers title to real property or a real property interest from one party (grantor) to another (grantee)” (Farlex Legal Dictionary). Selling a rental property may have tax consequences on the seller (under whose name the property is on before the sale), depending on whether there is a gain or loss from sales. Read the full answer…

A person has the right to leave an employment that they deem as detrimental to their general well-being; at the same time, a debtor under Chapter 13 has the right to convert to Chapter 7, provided that he or she is not ineligible based on bad faith or abuse of bankruptcy process. Read the full answer…

There are times when filing for bankruptcy may be the only option one has when faced with grave financial difficulties. However, there may be other alternatives to filing for bankruptcy such as debt consolidation, creating a repayment plans with creditors, creating a debt management plan, or possibly defaulting on the debt. Read the full answer…

Generally, a cancelled or forgiven debt for less than its full amount is considered as income for tax purposes (IRS Publication 4681). In cases of cancelled or forgiven debts following foreclosure or repossession, it is treated as a sale for which the debtor may realize gain or loss. Read the full answer…

The answer depends on whether there actually was an error committed by the District Attorney. Was your son actually protected by the restraining order but there was a clerical error? Based on the facts your provided, that is the only seemingly plausible error that might subject you to liability. However, it is not up to your wife whether the DA will reopen the case, it is simply up to the DA. Read the full answer…

A summons or subpoena is a common tool used by lawyers to mandate that witnesses show up to hearings and/or provide information. If served with a summons, it is imperative that you abide by it or face contempt of court (which could include fines and/or possible jail time). Read the full answer…

Assuming you have the money to pay for a private defense attorney, there are several ways to find one who is experienced in the area of felony rape, including internet and standard phone book searches. Typically, I find that the best way to select an attorney is through referral by others, which is a good way to gauge an attorney’s reputation and experience. Read the full answer…

Generally speaking, in California there are three sentencing ranges for each offense: lower, middle and upper. There’s a criminal sentencing chart that judges and criminal attorneys use that specify the ranges for each specific crime, and statutorily, this is the guideline that the judges have to follow. Read the full answer…

A parent who wants to change a final court decision on child custody bears the burden of proving that there is a substantial change in circumstances that would affect the child, and that a modification on custody would be for the child’s best interest. Read the full answer…

With some exceptions, the child of a woman who is married to a man who is not impotent or sterile is generally conclusively that man’s child (Fam.C. § 7540). However, if there is a dispute on the paternity of the child, or if there is a civil case where paternity is a related issue, Read the full answer…

The unmarried partner of a deceased may still have a right to claim from the property of the deceased, and their case may be seen as a Marvin claim, based on the Marvin v. Marvin (1976) case, where the Supreme Court addressed the issue of “the property rights of a nonmarital partner in the absence of an express contract.” Read the full answer…

The statute of limitations for credit card debts usually START from when the last payment was made, and ends after four (4) years for written contracts or open-ended, and two (2) years for unwritten accounts. After the appropriate time limit for the creditor to file a suit has passed, the debt is considered as a time-barred debt.

Read the full answer…

The statute of limitations for credit card debts in California is four (4) years based on a written contract, and is guided by the California Code of Civil Procedure 337. If a payment is made, the statute of limitations start running from the date the latest payment is made.
Read the full answer…

It is not unwise at all to contact IRS if one believes that they have unpaid taxes. In 2012, the IRS has made some changes on handling expat tax returns, giving them “a series of common-sense steps to help U.S. citizens abroad get current with their tax obligations and resolve pension issues,” Read the full answer…

Child support and custody/visitation are separate issues. The court could decide that one may be granted without the other. The court order for child support is guided by strict rules and computation according to the needs of the child based on a State-wide Uniform Guideline (Family Code § 4050 et seq.), Read the full answer…

It is the state’s policy to ensure the child’s welfare when granting custody (Fam. C. § 3020), and it is safe to assume that the court issues “an order for the custody of a child during minority that seems necessary or proper” (Fam. C. § 3022). Read the full answer…

In order for an individual to be able to claim dependents, he or she must not be a dependent him/herself. Generally, an individual may not claim those who are married and file a joint return as dependents. In order to claim a child as a dependent, there are a few guidelines that must be met.

Read the full answer…

Would you like to discuss your legal matter?

PHONE

image description
Kevin Aguilar RECEPTION (877)509-5204

I assist in scheduling new and existing clients for all offices. For initial consultations I will ask you a few questions and then find the best time for you to talk to one of the lawyers that best fits your legal matter.

Call me or use the email form and I will follow up with you right away.

EMAIL

  • Proper format "(999)999-9999"
The Law Offices of Tom Hogan will provide you with personalized attention and guidance. Protecting your rights is our main objective. We have been representing clients for the past 25 years and our experienced team of attorneys will advise you of the legal consequences of every decision you take.
Back to top