Archive for the ‘Estate Planning’ Category

Why You Should Retain an Attorney for Estate Planning

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Everyone has an estate. Your estate consists of everything you own – your home, car, personal possessions, bank accounts and any other assets. Because you are unable to keep these things forever, it is important to ensure they are allocated to the people and/or organizations of your choosing. This requires providing instructions stating whom you want to receive any assets, what they are to receive and when they are to receive it. That is the definition of estate planning.

Though estate planning may sound feasible for most people to do themselves, assistance from an attorney is recommended in order to assure costly mistakes are avoided. Knowing that your family’s future is secure will also help you have peace of mind.

Most people use a will to list how they would like their assets distributed. While this is a great start in estate planning, certain financial assets such as IRAs and 401(k)s may require additional documentation. Once you have taken an inventory of all of your financial assets, it is recommended to ask your attorney to help you obtain and complete the necessary documents.

It is also important to remember that an estate plan or will may need to be updated from time to time. Significant life events such as moving, the birth of a child, divorce or even acquiring an inheritance may trigger the need for changes to be made to an existing estate plan. Amended state and federal laws may also bring about the need to amend an estate plan. It is imperative to occasionally review your plan and keep it current.

In the case that a person becomes ill or disabled, it is important to include an advanced healthcare directive or durable power of attorney in the estate plan. If the situation arises that you are unable to communicate your healthcare wishes yourself, an advance healthcare directive will communicate them for you. A durable power of attorney allows another person to make medical and financial decisions in the event you are not able to so yourself. Including these documents in your estate plan will ensure your personal decisions in these matters are clearly outlined and respected.

The Law Office of Thomas Hogan is an Estate Planning specialist who is prepared to help in your time of need. Feel free to contact us if you are in need of help with Wills or Estate Planning in Modesto CA. Call (209) 214-6600 to speak with our Modesto California Attorneys.

New Form: Revocable Transfer on Death Deed

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Wrongful Death| Personal Injury| Thomas Hogan Law OfficeA new form of statutory deed entitled Revocable Transfer on Death Deed (TOD) has been established by the legislature. A TOD deed is a non-probate deed whereby the homeowner may deed his or her home to a name beneficiary and the transfer becomes operative on the homeowner’s death, but will remain revocable until he or she dies.

Why is this of importance to seniors? The TOD was created to allow single seniors or widows to escape probate without the need to draft a trust. Some parents add their children on the deed to the home as joint tenants for the sole purpose of avoiding probate. The problem with doing this is that the children immediately own part of the house, which may subject the house to the children’s creditors.

The beneficiary of a TOD effectuates the transfer when the homeowner dies by recording an affidavit of the transferor’s death certificate and also notifies Medi-Cal of the death.

This new law tries to combat elderly financial abuse by adding a 120 day rule and revocability of the deed. So that if you find out that Mother has transferred her home to her new boyfriend using a TOD deed and Mother is alive, you can simply have mom revoke it. But is mom is dead, you have 120 days to file a lawsuit against the boyfriend and record a lis pendens on the property so that new boyfriend is not able to sell the home.

One catch, If the beneficiary listed on the TOD deed dies before the granter, then the TOD deed is worthless and the property would be probated.

Also, one of the major disadvantages of the TOD deed is that the home will be subject to Medi-Cal recovery. While the legislature intended this new law to help low income seniors who can not afford to pay the legal fees required to draft estate planning documents, it is the low income seniors who are most likely to use Medi-Cal and perhaps lose their homes to a Medi-Cal lien.

As to married people, the best way to avoid probate on a home is to hold title as joint tenants or community property with right of survivor.

So while the TOD deed provides a possible solution for estate planning purposes for low income seniors, it leaves them open to folks who can and will commit fraud and abuse against the elderly. So please use this tool wisely.

The Law Office of Thomas Hogan is an Estate Planning specialist who is prepared to help in your time of need. Feel free to contact us if you are in need of help with Wills, TOD, or Estate Planning in Modesto CA. Call (209) 214-6600 to speak with our Modesto California Attorneys.